Author Topic: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber  (Read 575 times)

YELLO

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Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« on: September 26, 2018, 11:12:34 PM »
Since June 2018, Mr. Chhabra is the Sr. Director/Head of Public Affairs at Bird. Bird is a dockless scooter-share company based in Santa Monica, California. It operates electric scooters in cities throughout North America, at a cost of one dollar to rent plus fifteen to twenty cents per minute. Bird was founded in 2017 by Travis VanderZanden, formerly an executive at Lyft and at Uber.
In June 2018 after 4 years and 2 months Mr. Chhabra left his position at Uber where he was Head of Policy Development and Community Engagement; Director,  Self-Driving Policy.
Prior to joining Uber, Mr. Chhabra was Deputy Commissioner, Policy & Planning at the TLC for 4 years. Where according to his LinkedIn profile, Managed the Divisions of Policy, Research & Evaluation, External Affairs and Government Affairs to deliver on Mayor Bloomberg’s priority reforms relating to the taxi industry. Helped shape all major agency policy initiatives and served as principal on select initiatives considered central to the administration’s legacy.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.linkedin.com/in/akchhabra&ved=2ahUKEwjEubSGjdrdAhUvUt8KHTphDfkQFjAAegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw3a3tZGYJGZnz-mJRgGlJnP
« Last Edit: September 26, 2018, 11:18:10 PM by YELLO »

YELLO

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2018, 11:42:06 PM »

New York City Council Member Antonio Reynoso says electric scooters could be a reliable transit option here, especially as the L train shutdown strands straphangers.
City Council Member Antonio Reynoso and officials from Bird scooters are pushing for the city to legalize electric scooters ahead of the L train shutdown.
Electric scooters, like the Bird scooters available across the country, could help fill that transit gap, according to Reynoso — but they’re currently illegal here.
City Council Members Ydanis Rodriguez and Rafael Espinal are drafting legislation to legalize electric scooters in New York City. Reynoso added his support on Monday as many in his district are set to be affected by the L train shutdown.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://nypost.com/2018/09/24/e-scooters-may-be-coming-to-nyc/amp/&ved=2ahUKEwi50tvnn9rdAhVsk-AKHT-6Dn8QyM8BMAN6BAgJEAQ&usg=AOvVaw2iaY4_Qjk8xljMRrHqkneC&ampcf=1

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2018, 12:00:01 AM »
The tools, which Bird calls its “GovTech Platform,” are intended to assist cities in better integrating e-scooters into their overall transportation networks, the company says. But it will only be applicable to Bird’s scooters, not those from other companies.

The GovTech Platform includes a data dashboard for cities to track how its citizens are using electric scooters, as well as geofencing capabilities to prevent users from using or parking scooters in certain areas of the city. Bird has always offered anonymized data to cities in which it operates, but it admits that it can sometimes be clunky and difficult to parse through. In its initial release, the company’s dashboard will utilize API data on vehicle status and trips to create aggregated and categorized reports, in the hopes that it addresses any complaints for cities.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2018/9/24/17886390/bird-electric-scooter-share-ceo-travis-vanderzanden&ved=0ahUKEwjxiNvGpNrdAhUjiOAKHbSJBS4QyM8BCCQwAA&usg=AOvVaw2wOc4FwGwz9-o8ko4PXpWD&ampcf=1

YELLO

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2018, 12:02:21 AM »
The Los Angeles-based firm announced that it will form a new Global Safety Advisory Board led by David Strickland, former head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and more recently, spokesperson for the Self-Driving Coalition for Safer Streets, that will “create, advise, and implement global programs, campaigns, and products to improve the safety of those riding Birds and other e-scooters.”

Bird’s statement notes that the board, which will consist of transportation and safety experts as well as government officials and private citizens to be named later, won’t just focus on the safety of those riding scooters, but also pedestrians and bicyclists who share space with these riders.

In addition, Bird will begin steering revenue into a dedicated fund to expand transit infrastructure in the cities where it operates. The initiative would set aside $1 per day from each scooter in operation to help cities build new protected bike lanes, as well as maintain existing ones by repainting and repairing them.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.curbed.com/platform/amp/2018/8/2/17641604/bird-scooter-safety-bike-lane&ved=2ahUKEwiDm5zTpdrdAhViiOAKHZ8dApYQFjAAegQICBAB&usg=AOvVaw0a9ZEjVXZeTVJLMOyToqqe&ampcf=1

YELLO

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2018, 08:11:53 AM »
FROM August 2018:

Even as new modes of transportation have made inroads in New York City, dockless electric scooters—like the ones owned by Bird and Lime, which have become ubiquitous throughout the U.S.—have yet to make their presence known in the five boroughs.
Or have they? A tipster sent Curbed a video of a Bird scooter in use in Brooklyn amid a throng of cars and pedestrians. As of right now, electric scooters are not available in New York City—the closest cities with the service are Providence to the north, and Baltimore to the south—so it’s unclear how the scooter would have gotten here. (Did someone scoot all the way up I-95?)
And, more importantly, dockless electric scooters are not yet legal in NYC. A spokesperson for the city’s Department of Transportation recently told the New York Times that “They are illegal and I am not aware of anything in the works to change that.” If you are caught using one, you could incur a fee of $500.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://ny.curbed.com/platform/amp/2018/8/17/17720216/nyc-transportation-scooters-bird-brooklyn&ved=2ahUKEwjt-6uWk9vdAhXRmeAKHY9PCwgQFjAAegQIABAB&usg=AOvVaw3Y3F0RPI9tm7kxth9Nxr5W&ampcf=1


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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2018, 11:17:27 AM »
From May 2014:

A major taxi fleet owner is accusing a city official of secretly moonlighting for Uber before leaving the public payroll to take a job with the e-hail app
 
Evgeny "Gene" Friedman is accusing a former city official of secretly moonlighting for e-hail app company Uber.
A major taxi fleet owner is accusing a city official of secretly moonlighting for Uber before leaving the public payroll to take a job with the e-hail app company.

Evgeny "Gene" Freidman, president of Taxi Club Inc., which manages a fleet of 1,000 cabs, told the Taxi and Limousine Commission a month ago that Ashwini Chhabra was working for Uber while serving as deputy commissioner for policy and planning at the TLC, according to an email exchange between Mr. Freidman and Meera Joshi, the new head of the TLC. Mr. Chhabra’s move to Uber from the TLC was reported Tuesday by the New York Times.

About four or five weeks ago, according to the email thread, Mr. Freidman said he and Ethan Gerber, executive director of the Freidman-backed Greater New York Taxi Association, sat with Ms. Joshi and Mr. Chhabra and “accused Ashwini of working for Uber presently and in the past,” he writes.

“I would insist as a major stake holder in this industry ‎that the [TLC] open a [Department of Investigation] investigation into this matter!” Mr. Freidman writes, to which Ms. Joshi responds by saying she will “make [the] appropriate referrals.” The DOI, not the TLC, would make the decision on whether to investigate.

The email exchange was forwarded to reporters by PR executive Ronn Torossian, of whom Mr. Freidman is a client. A spokesman for the TLC confirmed that Ms. Joshi referred Mr. Freidman’s allegation to the Department of Investigation; DOI is run by Mark Peters, who was Mr. de Blasio's campaign treasurer and formerly ran the public integrity unit of the state attorney general's office when Eliot Spitzer held the post.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20140520/BLOGS04/140529985/taxi-mogul-suspects-city-official-moonlighted-for-uber&ved=2ahUKEwjO2K7Ro5DeAhWSjlkKHXWgCC0QFjAAegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw0NhqHL_UItg01Nc6bHi04u&cshid=1539875832004

YELLO

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2018, 11:53:04 AM »
 The Department of Transportation has added protected bike lanes as part of its mitigation plan for dealing with the L train shutdown, and Trottenberg predicted they would someday be used by e-scooters.

The scooters—which have been a hit in a few cities—are considered illegal in New York, but a bill to allow them is working its way through the City Council, while operators Bird and Lime work to convince regulators and elected officials that they are a safe transportation option.

"I think they will wind up in bike lanes," Trottenberg said. "They certainly are knocking at the gates of the city."

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.crainsnewyork.com/transportation/battle-curb-space-fever-pitch-trottenberg-says&ved=2ahUKEwiNr77cq5DeAhUoqlkKHbNaBX4QFjAAegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw2UwvslGA-DgckDUL7CLL_p&cshid=1539877963545
« Last Edit: October 18, 2018, 11:56:07 AM by YELLO »

YELLO

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2018, 04:49:39 PM »

As an investor/political consultant for Uber, Bradley Tusk directed the company’s aggressive efforts to mobilize consumers against New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio in 2015, and has since led similar campaigns for FanDuel and Bird.
So there was a four-year period or four-and-a-half-year period from when I started working with Uber, and we took on ride-sharing around every market in the U.S., it wasn’t a small undertaking. Until when I got other startups to start working with us, and then in raising our fund, same thing, every LP says, “I want a differentiated strategy.” It turns out they mean like a different font in the deck. Like when this political guy showed up and said, “I’m gonna get access to all these deals, because these companies are gonna really need my help, and they can’t get my help without me having investment rights.” Oh, that’s too weird. And now that we are in Bird and Circle and Coinbase and Lemonade and Ro and all these companies.
So Bird, we invested in their series A, we have been working all over the country to make scooters legal.

Having some trouble in San Francisco.

Definitely in San Francisco, but we won Miami a week ago, New York is looking good, Chicago.

There are lots of VCs that can fund something, but if you say, “I need to win this fight in 13 states, 18 cities, whatever it is ...

Like a Bird, like an Uber, like a FanDuel, like a Lemonade, whatever it is, then we are the only ones to do that.

Talk about your experience with Bird, for example.

So it is really interesting because Bird, the easy narrative for people is to say Bird is Uber 2.0. Both really, really fast-growing companies, both CEOs named Travis, the Travis at Bird worked at Uber. The reality is, in some ways they are similar but in many ways, they are different. So my vantage point is the political and regulatory strategy around legalization in different markets. With Uber, it was pretty much an all beg for forgiveness approach.

So do you dump them on the streets?

In some places, and then in other places like here in New York, the law clearly does not allow it, and we’re working with the city council right now, legislation that’ll be introduced shortly.


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.recode.net/platform/amp/2018/10/29/18038710/bradley-tusk-fixer-book-mobile-voting-blockchain-politics-kara-swisher-recode-decode-podcast&ved=2ahUKEwjat8m6v6zeAhWiSt8KHa_PADAQFjAAegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw22wLW2OqlhpPbaDOmZ5xjK&ampcf=1

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2018, 10:06:34 AM »
Detroit Mayor Calls for More E-Scooters, Smart Tech

While some cities have stumbled — literally in some cases — over electric scooters, Mayor Mike Duggan said the popular transportation option is only expected to expand in the Motor City.

Speaking early Monday at CityLab Detroit, the urban affairs conference at the Detroit Marriott Renaissance Center, Duggan said the scooters introduced this year have proven so popular that the city will encourage the operators to introduce even more.

And Duggan wants those scooters to appear more and more in the city's neighborhoods so residents can use them for shopping, commuting to work and other reasons.

Duggan's remarks on scooters were just part of a wide-ranging conversation on how cities are harnessing new mobility and digital options to create a city that works better.

Among other things he said Detroit is exploring: How to connect the city's streetlights to smartphone applications to capture data on, say, traffic usage or traffic jams. Duggan said many companies nationally are working on such apps and the city is speaking with them.

And with such novelties, Duggan said, the city will capture the data on usage patterns to make the city run that much more efficiently.

"These are the kinds of conversations we're having," he said.

The idea of capturing data from things like scooters and streetlights is central to the mission of CityLab Detroit. Cities everywhere are waking up to the amount of data they can collect to help their cities run more efficiently.

Speaking with Duggan at the morning chat on scooters, Janette Sadik-Khan, New York City's former transportation guru, said New York put GPS devices on thousands of Yellow cabs to produce data, which showed that closing the famed Times Square to vehicle traffic actually reduced vehicle passage times.

At the morning assembly, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, whose Bloomberg Philanthropy was a sponsor of the CityLab Detroit event that runs through Tuesday, told the several hundred attendees that "cities like Detorit are engines of global progress."

"Cities are now driving the agenda in this country ... leading in the way Washington will not," Bloomberg said.


** Janette Sadik-Khan, principal at Bloomberg Associates and chair of NACTO, on behalf of Michael R. Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies and Mayor of New York City, 2002-2013.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.govtech.com/fs/transportation/Detroit-Mayor-Calls-for-More-E-Scooters-Smart-Tech.html%3FAMP&ved=2ahUKEwiNyLag67DeAhXnY98KHY4xCWUQyM8BMAB6BAgGEAQ&usg=AOvVaw1mG8XN2LL3cmlRpsw3o3ZP&ampcf=1
« Last Edit: October 31, 2018, 10:15:38 AM by YELLO »

nyctaxinews

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2018, 10:21:30 AM »
The Scooters are accidents waiting to happen! Many will fall when hitting pot holes or other obstructions in the road. The riders will be hurt or run over by vehicles.

What will Bloomberg say then? Bloomberg wants to be President. Just what we need (not), a person with a personal vendetta in the white house.

YELLO

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2018, 11:25:48 AM »
From September 27, 2018:


FORD, UBER AND LYFT ANNOUNCE AGREEMENT TO SHARE DATA THROUGH NEW PLATFORM THAT GIVES CITIES AND MOBILITY COMPANIES NEW TOOLS TO MANAGE CONGESTION, CUT GREENHOUSE GASES AND REDUCE CRASHES.

Ford president and CEO Jim Hackett today announced Ford’s commitment to Shared Streets, a new data platform designed to make it easier for the private sector to work with cities around the world and leverage data to improve urban mobility. Ford’s commitment includes developing a universal data standard for real-time curb demand and availability.

Ford Motor Company, Uber and Lyft today announced an unprecedented commitment to SharedStreets, a new data platform designed to make it easier for the private sector to work with cities around the world andleverage data to improve urban mobility. The data sets pledged by the companies will provide the public and private sectors with new tools to manage curb space in order to reduce congestion and emissions that cause climate change; improve the efficiency of city streets by making it easier for everyone to get around; and save lives by preventing traffic crashes.

The groundbreaking public-private partnership is the result of a collaboration with the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), the Open Transport Partnership and Bloomberg Philanthropies, the consortium behind the innovative SharedStreets data platform. This collaborative effort to build 21st-century streets was announced by Jim Hackett, CEO of Ford Motor Company, Dara Khosrowshahi, CEO of Uber, and John Zimmer, Co-founder and President of Lyft at the second annual Bloomberg Global Business Forum in New York City. They were joined by Janette Sadik-Khan, principal at Bloomberg Associates and chair of NACTO, on behalf of Michael R. Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies and Mayor of New York City, 2002-2013.
The partnership gives mayors unparalleled access to road traffic data, allowing them to make better planning and investmentdecisions as shared and autonomous mobility arrive in their cities. The agreement also fills a long-missing link for mobility companies, providing a common standard for sharing data across all cities, where local requirements currently vary widely.

Launched earlier this year with funding from Bloomberg Philanthropies, SharedStreets is a universal data language for sharing information about city streets and a launching pad for public-private collaboration to manage streets, reduce traffic deaths, and prepare cities for the unprecedented technological advancement emerging in cities. Already operating in over 30 cities around the world, the SharedStreets platform and this new partnership will provide city leaders with far-reaching new instruments for managing transportation networks.

The agreement includes:

In partnership with Ford, developing a universal data standard for real-time curb demand and availability.With this tool, cities will be able to responsibly price and manage curb space in real-time, for the first time. It will provide a down payment on a global, comprehensive roadway pricing mechanism that cities and companies can use to encourage sustainable transportation choices, reallocate road space, and reduce carbon emissions.
In partnership with Uber, producing the first-ever freely available global data set of vehicle driving speeds. Building on one of the first features developed by SharedStreets, Uber will release vehicle speed data from cities around the world. With this critical data, cities can identify where exactly on their streets people are speeding or otherwise driving dangerously, so that they can redesign streets and save lives. Uber will include this speed in an update of its open-source Kepler.gl tool, providing cities everywhere with innovative new tools for data visualization and information sharing. Lyft will follow with a release their own city speed data set.
Lyft will join SharedStreets and Uber to produce a universal framework for sharing curbside pick-up/drop-off counts. Building on an early SharedStreetsfeature first announced with Uber, Lyft will also collaborate on a model for providing anonymized, aggregated curb usage data to leading cities everywhere. With this model, city leaders can understand where for-hire vehicle trips are in the greatest demand, so that they can reduce congestion, make our curbsides more innovative and efficient and better serve everyone on foot, on a bike or behind the wheel.
“This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for business and government to work together to rethink transportation,” said Jim Hackett, president and CEO, Ford Motor Company. “Collaborating through initiatives such as Shared Streets will enable us to use vehicles, road systems and data together to create a new roadmap for mobility. We are working toward a future where all cities are smart and curb space is actively managed, increasing efficiency and safety, while reducing driver stress and pollution.”

“The private and public sectors need to come together and collaborate on ways to create smarter, safer and more efficient transportation systems,” said Dara Khosrowshahi, CEO, Uber. “It’s the responsibility of companies like ours to step up and support cities in every way we can—whether that’s through data sharing, urban planning research, funding for nonprofits, or even through the introduction of new and more efficient forms of transportation like electric bicycles.”

“Lyft is in a unique position to drive positive change within our cities, and we take that responsibility seriously" said John Zimmer, President and Co-Founder of Lyft. “We are committed to partnering with cities and data-driven decision making to design streets that provide safe and accessible transportation for everyone. We look forward to collaborating with regulators to expand affordable mobility options, taking cars off the road and reducing congestion, and ultimately reshaping cities around people - not cars.”

“Ride-share and auto companies have been gathering an enormous amount of data on transportation and traffic. Now, cities will be able use it to find new ways to manage congestion, reduce carbon emissions, prevent traffic crashes, and prepare for the arrival of autonomous vehicles,” said Michael R. Bloomberg. “It’s a great example of how governments and businesses can work together to solve tough problems and build a better world - and I want to thank all the companies that are taking part.”

“Code is the new concrete for 21st century cities and we need a digital infrastructure to share data and create safer and more sustainable streets,” said Janette Sadik-Khan. “The SharedStreets platform offers cities and private sector players a powerful new data sharing tool to make that future possible.”

In addition to launching the new tools and partnerships, NACTO, representing 74 cities and transit agencies across North America, and global cities from Paris to Melbourne formally endorsed the data sharing policies of SharedStreets, committing to working collaboratively with the private sector. They join the six cities that have participated in pilots to develop new data standards and features or that have been formally trained on the platforms new tools and capabilities, together reaching more than millions city residents around the globe.

 

About SharedStreets
First funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies and developed by NACTO and the Open Transport Partnership, the SharedStreetssuite is a neutral, anonymized clearinghouse for data collected by transportation providers, private companies and government agencies, as well as a hub for industry-leading data analysis, traffic planning, street design and development of new technologies. The platform overcomes long-standing legal, regulatory and technological barriers between the public and private sectors by converting today’s ad hoc, disparate transportation data sources into a mutually readable, shared, global standard for the first time. It introduces a universal language for digitally describing every aspect of city streets, opening new markets to private sector innovators and eliminating the need to manually “clean,” collate and transfer data sources, saving crucial public funds. Visit the SharedStreetsproject online at SharedStreets.io.

About Uber
Uber’s mission is to bring reliable transportation to everywhere, for everyone. We started in 2010 to solve a simple problem: how do you get a ride at the touch of a button? More than eight years and five billion trips later, we’ve started tackling an even greater challenge: reducing congestion and pollution in our cities by getting more people into fewer cars.

About Lyft
Lyft was founded in 2012 by Logan Green and John Zimmer to improve people’s lives with the world’s best transportation. Lyft is the fastest growing rideshare company in the U.S. and is available to 95 percent of the US population as well as in Ontario, Canada. Lyft is preferred by drivers and passengers for its reliable and friendly experience, and its commitment to effecting positive change for the future of our cities, as the first rideshare company to offset carbon emissions from all rides globally

About NACTO
NACTO is an association of 74 major North American cities andtransit agencies formed to exchange transportation ideas, insights, and practices and cooperatively approach national transportation issues. The organization’s mission is to build cities as places for people, with safe, sustainable, accessible, and equitable transportation choices that support a strong economy and vibrant quality of life.


About Bloomberg Philanthropies
Bloomberg Philanthropies’ mission is to ensure better, longer lives for the greatest number of people. The organization focuses on five key areas for creating lasting change: Public Health, Environment, Education, Government Innovation and the Arts. Bloomberg Philanthropies encompasses all of Michael R. Bloomberg’s charitable activities, including his foundation and his personal giving. In 2015, Bloomberg Philanthropies distributed $510 million. For more information, please visit bloomberg.org or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter @BloombergDotOrg.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2018/09/26/ford-uber-and-lyft-agreement-data.html&ved=2ahUKEwiU84b-_LDeAhXCTN8KHf-iBDwQFjAAegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw0REQKir1oNvYFAcIi1JgYb&cshid=1540999529689

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2018, 02:14:27 PM »
Disgusting....   >:(

Antieuba

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2018, 04:37:10 PM »
7 suicides

647% increase in black car crashes (2014-2018 monthly)

15 billion dollars of equity transferred from medallion owners to a multi national Saudi and Russian oligarch funded corporate predator

Most of the credit unions wiped out

20 billion dollars a year lost because of congestion

Billions of dollars lost in tax and fee revenue that could have been used to repair NYCHA, subways, to fund education, health, to alleviate homelessness.........

Huge loss of revenue to public transportation

Increases in asthma and other respiratory diseases

SADIK-KHAN, BLOOMBERG, NATCO, FORD, UBER, LYFT, SHAREDSTREETS, OPEN TRANSPORT PARTNERSHIP  —-

PLEASE STOP “HELPING” US!!!!

Antieuba

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2018, 05:09:11 PM »
And by the way —

NONE OF THESE ENTITIES WITHIN THE THOUGHT BUBBLE ECHO CHAMBER WERE

         ELECTED!

YELLO

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2018, 09:22:10 AM »
 What a surprise@

Uber throws its hat into Austin scooter race.

Electric scooters are a veritable craze in Austin these days (and possibly also a veritable way to break your ankle, depending on whom you ask). To date, Bird and Lime have emerged as top contenders in the scooter arms race, but just this week Uber announced its own plans for scootering to success in Austin. Scooters will be distributed by Uber’s Jump subsidiary, which it acquired earlier this year. Riders can get their scoot on by using the Uber app. Curious? The company is offering free rides, and helmets, now through November 11.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.builtinaustin.com/2018/11/01/austin-tech-roundup-110118&ved=2ahUKEwiz08CxpLPeAhVDSN8KHXfsAz4QFjAAegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw1ONorFjeKJanCQaDQKybb7&cshid=1541078485316
« Last Edit: November 01, 2018, 09:43:44 AM by YELLO »

YELLO

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2018, 09:00:47 AM »
Scooter firm Bird pushes for law change with London trial.

The Californian electric scooter business Bird is launching a pilot service on London's Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

It is illegal to ride powered scooters on public roads or pavements in the UK but Bird hopes to get the law changed within 12 months.

The company, which operates in around 40 American cities, believes that its pilot scheme - on private land - will demonstrate the usefulness of this hop on, hop off form of transport and its environmental benefits.

The scooters are unlocked with an app, and will only be available between 07:00 and 21:00.

They will then be collected and charged overnight, and Bird says that will mean that the problems with theft, vandalism - and late-night drunks - which have afflicted some bike-sharing schemes, will be avoided.

By making a big noise about this small pilot scheme the Californian company hopes to build momentum towards getting the law changed, so that it can start a commercial operation on London's streets.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.bbc.com/news/amp/technology-46103713&ved=0ahUKEwjlq9bZt8LeAhWLct8KHZEkCpcQyM8BCCUwAA&usg=AOvVaw1cdiOnkd8RZSVXwCgFNUtM&ampcf=1

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2018, 05:38:29 PM »

Bird scooter riders not covered for damages


When you're riding the scooters, you really are riding at your own risk," said State Farm agent Risha Sanders.

Bird scooters asks users to sign a 14-page document before riding, one that Sanders says has a clause that excludes the company from paying any damages, leaving the rider liable.


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.bigcountryhomepage.com/news/main-news/scooter-riders-beware-insurance-may-not-cover-damages/1591841343&ved=2ahUKEwikv7z1stLeAhXEY98KHTF8BqsQxfQBMAF6BAgAEAQ&usg=AOvVaw3GwgUaG-T0YkUx-f7TR5-E&cshid=1542147573325



Scooter company Bird doesn't like DC's new proposed rules


The District Department of Transportation’s new rules for dockless bikes and scooters starting in 2019 have ruffled Bird’s feathers.

The electric-scooter operator is specifically concerned that limiting the number of scooters in any company’s fleet will make it unprofitable, and capping speeds of scooters would actually increase risk.

The Department of Transportation’s proposed cap on the number of e-scooters available to the people of D.C. eliminates any chance of this program being equitable, of solving issues related to transportation deserts in the city, and ultimately getting more cars off the road,” wrote David Estrada, head of government partnerships at Bird in his letter to Bowser.

“Also, a capped number of scooters incentivizes e-scooter providers to put their vehicles only in popular, high-density areas, not in historically under-served areas that would most benefit from an affordable and reliable transit option such as Bird,” he said.

Electric bikes will be required to be modified so they don’t go any faster than 20 mph, and scooters will be limited to no more than 10 mph.

“Vehicles traveling at significantly different speeds will create dangerous conditions, and could increase opportunity for collisions between cars, e-scooters and bikes. There is also no data to suggest that 10 mph is safer for e-scooter riders than 15 mph,” Estrada said

In response to new regulations and terms and conditions published by Washington, D.C.’s department of transportation last week, Bird, one of the most popular electric scooter providers, said “it is impossible for any provider to serve the D.C. community,” if the rules take effect next year.


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://statescoop.com/washington-d-c-scooter-regulations-are-impossible-bird-says/&ved=2ahUKEwiA0N2it9LeAhWETN8KHe_RAQAQxfQBMAF6BAgJEAg&usg=AOvVaw3TMhjRwpjGN1o8ekujU_1a&cshid=1542148685315

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2018, 10:01:31 AM »
What a surprise!!!

City extends dockless bike-share pilot by 90 days.

To no one's surprise, the dockless bike-share pilot, which began in July with a four-month time line, has been extended by 90 days. All three operators are continuing: Lime in the Rockaways and Staten Island, Jump Bikes in the Bronx and on Staten Island, and Citi Bike in the Bronx.

Department of Transportation spokeswoman said the extension is "for the purpose of further evaluation."

The pilot comes at a time of mounting tensions in the bike-share industry, which has become somewhat of a proxy battle between the two ride-hail giants, Uber and Lyft.

The pilot also could be a prelude to the introduction of shared e-scooters, which are believed to have the greatest business potential of any of the so-called micro-mobility modes. E-scooters are currently illegal in New York City.

All three players are either operating scooters or testing them out in other markets. A fourth, Santa Monica, Calif.-based scooter operator Bird, has set up an operation in Manhattan and has been meeting with regulators and city officials.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.crainsnewyork.com/transportation/dockless-bike-share-pilot-extended&ved=0ahUKEwjIn52EltneAhUPTt8KHfLaCIQQxfQBCCUwAA&usg=AOvVaw2j5puBUSmKGpZoGy3AtAa_

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2018, 11:22:05 AM »

Department of Transportation spokeswoman said the extension is "for the purpose of further evaluation."

Further evaluation? Dec Jan and Feb. Ever try riding downhill on ice with a bike?

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2018, 08:13:58 AM »
Sound familiar?

Some e-scooter startups, with ex-Lyft and Uber executive Travis VanderZanden’s Bird Rides leading the pack, arrived unannounced. “The places where there are no laws, that’s where we go in,” explained VanderZanden at the Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit in October, referencing the fact that many cities’ laws made no reference to e-scooters before this summer.

On November 11th, David Estrada, Head of Government Partnerships for Bird Rides, wrote a public letter to the newly elected mayor of D.C., Muriel Bowser. Estrada condemned the city’s proposed e-scooter regulations, which will take effect in 2019 at the conclusion of D.C.’s ongoing pilot program.

Bird and other e-scooter providers argue that caps on the number of permitted units they can operate in a city incentivize neglect of underserved areas and are ignorant of purportedly high demand. D.C. allows companies to propose quarterly increases in scooter counts. Austin also allows fleet increases if companies can demonstrate that e-scooters are being used regularly.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.muckrock.com/news/archives/2018/nov/19/e-scooters-rundown/&ved=0ahUKEwiHiaCLxODeAhXCdN8KHQmABSQQxfQBCC8wAg&usg=AOvVaw0tro2JhZclarPZYPBe8QwU

Scooter startups have launched safety campaigns in an effort to get people to begin following their rules and wearing helmets while also arguing that focusing on scooter safety misses the broader impact of reducing reliance on automobiles.

The true danger on our roads is cars,” a Bird spokesperson said. “The fewer cars on the road, the safer our city streets become.”


A spokesperson from Bird said safety is a top priority and that the company has given away more than 50,000 helmets. It also established a safety advisory board in August. And last week, the company introduced a new “Community Mode” feature, which allows anyone with the app to report damaged devices or irresponsible parking that may pose a danger.

But Bird also sponsored a bill in California that reversed the original helmet requirement for people over the age of 18. Bird’s newly-introduced legislation permits non-minors to legally ride scooters without wearing helmets, consistent with rules already in place for cyclists. Governor Jerry Brown signed off on the new law in late September.

“The outcome of this legislative process will not change Bird's ongoing efforts to promote the safe riding of our vehicles,” a company spokesperson said. “We strongly encourage all riders to wear helmets.”

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/ncna937376&ved=2ahUKEwjFg9bzxODeAhXnYt8KHdF7ARYQyM8BMAB6BAgGEAQ&usg=AOvVaw0eYjueXtW0-Ia2LZtb3tPx&ampcf=1
« Last Edit: November 19, 2018, 08:19:38 AM by YELLO »

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2018, 09:29:19 AM »
Here we go again....

Bird recently announced it’s bringing dockless rides to London – but only in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park for a limited time.

Because at the moment, electric scooters in the UK are illegal. Sort of. Well…it’s complicated.

The Department for Transport (DfT) classes electric scooters as ‘Personal Light Electric Vehicle (PLEV)’ because they’re powered by a motor and says they can only be used on private property. It’s the same for hoverboards, electric skateboards and twist-throttle electric bikes.

Pedal-assisted electric bikes are okay, as long as they’re capped at 15.5mph.

You can’t ride scooters on the road, because the DVLA requires that electric vehicles be registered and taxed. And you can’t ride scooters on the pavement because of the 1835 Highways Act that prohibits anyone from riding a ‘carriage’ on the pavement.

These regulations have frustrated scooter start-ups from launching in the UK, despite the fact they’re proving popular in cities like Tel Aviv and Paris.

Bird’s European boss Patrick Studener has written that the laws should be changed.

We fully appreciate that this might require reviewing the laws mentioned dating as far back as 1835 and any other relevant ones and how they impact innovation,’ he wrote.

‘[Things] hopefully [have] moved into a better direction versus 183 years ago.’

Even though these devices are technically illegal, many people are willing to take their chances in an effort to ease their commute or go out on rides with their children.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://metro.co.uk/2018/11/23/why-are-electric-scooters-illegal-in-the-uk-the-183-year-old-laws-restricting-the-latest-craze-8171444/amp/&ved=0ahUKEwintLm9ne3eAhWydN8KHWkEDWsQyM8BCE8wCA&usg=AOvVaw2EKxRLWm4ay8CV_P1jdv9K&ampcf=1


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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2018, 12:04:37 PM »
The lines between car sharing and electric scooter firms are becoming increasingly blurred as they cross-fertilize expertise and innovation, making the big winner sustainable transport. That’s good news for business, transport users and the climate, with the transportation sector as the number one cause of carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S., according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

“Micro-mobility” in the form of electric scooters and electric bikes that are ideal for short trips, especially in traffic-dense urban areas, is the latest trend in sustainable transport. Everyone, it seems, wants to be part of it – even the companies that are traditionally tied to the automobile.

San Francisco-based electric scooter startup Lime recently announced it would make its operations in Seattle the largest free-floating car-sharing network in a U.S. city. And last month, a pair of Uber executives joined electric scooter startup Bird, citing the potential to take transportation to the next level by pioneering “Rideshare 2.0” technologies in order to solve ongoing transportation problems.

Uber, for its part, last month purchased Jump, a dockless electric bicycle sharing company, and is now using Jump to add electric scooter sharing to its portfolio of services. At TechCrunch Disrupt SF, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said that the company expects electric bicycles and scooters to become the future of urban transportation. He said a decade from now, ride-hailing will be less than 50 percent of all Uber’s business.

These new modes of transport often outrun the ability of cities to study and regulate them, requiring better coordination between public and private sectors, as well as added incentives to steer riders towards shared systems. Regulating app-based mobility services was the focus of a recent roundtable held by the International Transport Forum, looking at congestion both on roads and the curb.

“In order to create an ecosystem that can ensure the success of a virtuous cycle between these new modes and established public transit, government needs to lead,” wrote Gabe Klein, Co-Founder of CityFi, an urban change management firm, in Forbes. “City government should be at the forefront of shaping the rollout of these systems in collaborative, co-creative ways.”

As Klein sees it, “This is not an either/or choice between regulation or innovation. In truth, clear regulation can help scale up innovation.”
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.triplepundit.com/2018/11/sustainable-transport-ride-hailing-and-electric-scooters-innovations/&ved=0ahUKEwivrszbwfLeAhUJpFkKHSH1CKE4HhDF9AEIJDAA&usg=AOvVaw1PSAJAL1rTuZspKh-5jt8t

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2018, 09:48:38 PM »

E-scooters and bikes could be street legal under new legislation -

Zipping around the city is about to get a whole lot easier.

The City Council is introducing legislation Wednesday that will legalize electric scooters and bikes — delighting those who support having the souped-up machines on city streets, but raising concerns among critics who fear they are dangerous.

The Council will consider four bills in total, including legislation that will permit electric-motor-propelled two-wheelers to go up to 15 mph — and allow companies to set up scooter-share programs under a city pilot program.

There will also be legislation to legalize e-bikes, which are popular with restaurant delivery workers. The bills will create two classes of bicycles with motors under 750 watts that can reach speeds up to 20 mph.

One type of e-bike has a motor that makes it easier to pedal while another has a motor operated with a throttle. Another bill in the package would create program for low-income New Yorkers to convert their throttle bikes into pedal-assist rides.

“The numbers have been increasing,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, the transportation committee chairman, told the Daily News. “There’s a demand.”

He’s introducing the bills along with Councilmen Rafael Espinal of Brooklyn and Fernando Cabrera of the Bronx.

The administration has also said that e-scooters may be barred under state law, as well — but that city officials are open to discussing solutions.

“While e-scooters are illegal under state and city law, the mayor is committed to innovation as part of his all-of-the-above transportation strategy to get New Yorkers moving again,” de Blasio spokesman Seth Stein said. “We look forward to reviewing the proposals with an eye toward both transportation innovation and safety on our streets and sidewalks.”

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/ny-metro-electric-bicycle-scooter-council-20181127-story.html%3FoutputType%3Damp&ved=0ahUKEwjz1L3MiPbeAhXOmuAKHSo5BmAQyM8BCDQwAw&usg=AOvVaw0DwL9go_usqDUUzeyD9rUT&ampcf=1

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2018, 08:01:21 PM »
Bill Would Open New York's Streets to E-Bikes & E-Scooters.

Flanked by two electric scooters, several City Council members made the case at a City Hall press conference Wednesday that now is the time to legalize all types of electric bikes and electric scooters.

Their proposals come after years of confusion and controversy over current laws, and right as e-scooter sharing companies Bird and Lime are looking to enter the New York City market. (They are currently available in Austin but were recently banned in San Francisco.)

If we have electrical scooter or electrical bike, it will help reduce New York City's carbon footprint," Transportation Committee Chairman Ydanis Rodriguez said.

Councilman Rafael Espinal who introduced 3 of the 4 bills, made the case that they could be useful during the L train shutdown next April.

"Our MTA is crumbling, congestion is at an all time high, people are relying on bikes and they're looking for other modes to get around. So an e-scooter or e-bike is that alternative," he said.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.wnyc.org/story/council-considers-bills-legalize-e-scooters-and-e-bikes/&ved=0ahUKEwjRpKX0r_jeAhVDheAKHfORDo0QxfQBCCowAQ&usg=AOvVaw2d96DVpFtHaKtvGkIPz9Wh

Electric scooters are now disrupting wrists, elbows and heads
Injured scooter riders are flooding US emergency rooms. Accident rates could be as high as 1,000 per month.

Silicon Valley is known for "disruption" -- the idea of changing a service or product with technology to make it better. But, over the past few years, many of these innovations have produced unintended consequences. Facebook, originally conceived to "connect" people, is being blamed for undermining political elections around the world. Uber, devised to provide rides at the "touch of a button," is said to exacerbate traffic problems and clog city streets.

Now electric scooters -- first seen as a fun way to solve the last-mile puzzle -- are leading to deadly situations.

"This is disruptive technology," said Dr. Christopher Ziebell, emergency room medical director at Austin's Dell Seton Medical Center. "But this time the disruption is disrupting forearms, elbows and heads."

With every disastrous accident, the scooter companies repeat the same mantra: "Safety is our very top priority," a Bird spokeswoman said.

"We strongly recommend reporting any damaged scooters or incidents that Bird scooters are involved in, as we have a support team dedicated to safety that is available around the clock to address questions and reports we receive," she added.

A Lime spokesman said, "Safety is incredibly important to Lime, and we're constantly educating our riders and developing new tools to promote safety and prevent accidents on our platform."

Other scooter companies have vehicles on city streets, too, including Scoot, Skip, Spin, Lyft and Uber's Jump. But Bird and Lime have more scooters in more cities than their rivals do. Lime said it's given more than 20 million rides around the world, and Bird's latest numbers show it's given more than 10 million. The scooters cost $1 to rent plus 15 cents for every minute of riding time.
Bird and Lime are in the process of rolling out their own in-house scooter models, but for now they still use vehicles made by third-party manufacturers, including Xiaomi and Segway.

Lime launched a $3 million safety campaign earlier this month called "Respect the Ride" that promotes safe riding behavior and gives out free helmets. And Bird says it'll also send a free helmet to anyone who uses its scooters. So far, Bird said it's given away more than 50,000 helmets.

But Bird was also instrumental in repealing California's helmet law for electric scooters. Under current state law, people must wear helmets while riding these vehicles, which can travel at 15 mph. Bird sponsored a bill in February to get rid of that law, which passed in September. Starting January, helmets will no longer be required for scooter riders in California.

Bird said its goal in sponsoring the legislation was to create "consistent ridership rules" between e-scooters and e-bikes since helmets aren't required with e-bikes.

Rider agrees that Vehicles are machines that may malfunction," reads Bird's agreement. "Rider assumes full and complete responsibility for all related risks, dangers, and hazards."

These terms of service are similar to what people agree to when they sign up for apps like Uber and Lyft. The Lime spokesman said its agreement is "designed to be user friendly, and is written in plain language so that our riders are properly informed."

"Sometimes accidents do happen," he added, "which is why we have insurance policies and processes in place to support our riders and investigate all incidents."

Despite the user agreements, lawyers across the country say they're still getting dozens of calls from people hurt in scooter accidents.


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.cnet.com/google-amp/news/electric-scooters-by-bird-and-lime-are-causing-injuries-and-accidents/&ved=0ahUKEwiggKfqpffeAhXBrFkKHeSOCeUQyM8BCCgwAA&usg=AOvVaw3nXU4KUvVeFJzQZM4VMyqk&ampcf=1

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2018, 04:24:11 PM »

Now any rich idiot can run their own Bird scooter empire.

So you fancy yourself an entrepreneur. A doer. Someone who seizes opportunities and grabs life by the handlebars. Well hot damn, has Bird got a deal for you.

You see, for the low low cost of buying your own e-scooters and paying Bird a 20 percent commission on all rides in perpetuity, you can now run your own fleet of Bird scooters. The program, announced Nov. 27, is called Bird Platform, and gives would-be two-wheeled tycoons the opportunity to do Bird CEO Travis VanderZanden's job for him.
So just how much does each scooter cost? We reached out to Bird to find out, but didn't get an answer to that specific question by press time. We do, however, know about that 20 percent cut Bird takes thanks to TechCrunch.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://mashable.com/article/bird-platform-scooter-rental-empire.amp&ved=0ahUKEwjry-HznfreAhWRneAKHcL_CxkQyM8BCCcwAA&usg=AOvVaw3o0SZjyI00X_yqsXAPlTMf&ampcf=1


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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2018, 05:45:56 PM »
Electric scooters are being hailed as the next major trend in urban transportation. Companies like Bird, Skip, and Lime have thousands of dockless scooters for rent in major cities across the world. But with the growing number of scooter riders, the number of scooter accidents has risen as well. While there are no official statistics available, there have been a handful of scooter-related deaths worldwide, and emergency rooms say they have seen an uptick in scooter-related broken bones and head injuries. And that’s not counting cuts and bruises that don’t require an ER visit.

However, scooter companies often cite safety as a top priority after major incidents. For instance, in October, a class action lawsuit was filed against Lime and Bird in California on behalf of injured riders, alleging that the companies distributed scooters that weren’t able to withstand daily use and abuse, and that the devices did not include adequate safety information. In response to the suit, Lime told the San Jose Mercury News that safety has always been “at the very core” of the company’s business, and Bird said in a statement that “safety is our very top priority.” But according to a new study focusing specifically on Bird, there’s a mismatch between what the company says about safety and the the message it sends through its Instagram account.

The researchers, both affiliated with the University of Southern California, analyzed Bird’s 324 Instagram posts between September 2017 and November 2018. About 69% included people, and just 6% of those photos showed riders wearing protective gear. And a measly 1.5% mention safety anywhere in photos’ captions.

The account also reposted photos from users riding without safety gear, which, the researchers write, signals to its 70,000 followers “that Bird approves of customers riding without a helmet.”

When asked for comment on the study’s findings, Bird reiterates its commitment to safety. “Bird is continually expanding our safety education materials and currently takes a number of proactive and tangible measures to encourage the safe and responsible use of our vehicles,” the company told Quartz. “Posing beside a Bird should not require a helmet, just as posing by a parked car should not require a seatbelt. We have however found Instagram is not a platform best suited for rider education. Instead, we have invested millions of dollars on providing online and offline rider safety programs.”

If you look at Bird’s Instagram, most of its photos are of hip young people looking like they’re having fun. Sometimes, though, they seem to be having fun in a way that would threaten their own safety, like wearing a bird costume, riding with a dog, or filming while scootering — and the videos they post suggest they’re doing more than just “posing beside a Bird.”

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://qz.com/1477670/electric-scooter-company-birds-instagram-doesnt-promote-safe-riding/amp/&ved=2ahUKEwjo0tTC5PzeAhUQJt8KHdfEAbQQqUMwA3oECAgQEQ&usg=AOvVaw12Y1YhAj3QEUSQp5FvSuDF

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2018, 06:32:12 PM »
I hope you're not surprised.  Ashwini really never left Uber.



Uber said to be negotiating electric scooter startup acquisition.

Uber, the premier name in ride-hailing apps, wants to be known as the go-to destination for all on-demand transportation needs, and so its latest efforts have naturally gravitated toward growing its share of the booming electric scooter rental business. The company seems to have decided that its best path for acquiring a leadership position in this market is to literally acquire the leaders. The Information reports that Uber has held talks with Bird on a possible “multibillion-dollar” acquisition and, as a fallback, Uber has also been talking to smaller competitor Lime as well.

There’s strong impetus for getting a deal done from both sides, as Uber seeks to lock up the market before it’s fully formed and the budding unicorn startups work to secure the funding to match their hyper-accelerated growth. The Information suggests that Uber is looking to secure a deal with either Bird or Lime before the end of the year, which suggests negotiations are already at an advanced stage.

Without denying The Information’s information about ongoing talks, Bird CEO Travis VanderZanden has told the reporters that “Bird is not for sale,” which may or may not be a negotiating tactic. Of course, there’s always the chance that no agreement is reached between any of the three parties, but it does seem like we’re going to be heading into 2019 with Uber in a commanding position near the top of the nascent scooter-sharing market.


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2018/12/1/18120933/uber-bird-lime-acquisition-negotiaton-report&ved=0ahUKEwiHkq6b5P_eAhVK1oMKHS_vCiMQyM8BCCUwAA&usg=AOvVaw2pfM9_2rECnYWLkczroTBP&ampcf=1

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2018, 10:35:05 PM »

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #29 on: December 10, 2018, 12:48:41 PM »
Incestuous:


Inc.com
Here's Why 2018 Belonged to Bird, the $2 Billion Startup.


The first 10 Birds descended on Santa Monica, California, in early September 2017. Within days, this small migration became more like an invasion. Soon, locals woke to see Birds scattered across the city's sidewalks and bike paths and on the boardwalk at Venice Beach--some 250 e-scooters left by the fledgling startup Bird Rides, along with instructions on how to rent them using an app. No one had invited Bird to Santa Monica. There were also no laws that specifically banned (or permitted) Bird's business--the closest were the city's regulations governing sidewalk food stands. "We are not selling hot dogs and tacos," Travis VanderZanden, Bird's founder, CEO, and head provocateur, said in March. "We felt we were in a gray area."


VanderZanden wasted little time exploiting that area, alerting Santa Monica mayor Ted Winterer, via a LinkedIn message, that many more Birds were coming. "We have $3M in venture funding to focus on the traffic and parking problems in Santa Monica and Venice," the message read. "I'd love to work together." The mayor's response was far less chummy, perhaps because VanderZanden's missive had landed after those Birds had. "If your company is the one deploying electric scooters in the public right of way," Winterer shot back, "my understanding is there are serious legal issues with doing so." He then pushed VanderZanden off to other city officials.


But many residents of this beachfront community--long a haven for cyclists, skateboarders, inline and roller skaters, and Razor scooterers--proved far more enthusiastic. Chaos quickly ensued. Citizens piloted Birds on the sidewalk (illegally). Teens caused mayhem by ignoring traffic laws while double-riding. Pedestrians tripped over discarded scooters that clogged the walkways. There were accidents, serious head injuries--Birds zip along at 15 miles an hour, and few trying them out wore helmets--and hundreds of tickets issued to riders. There was a protest. There was a counterprotest. Six months after the scooters appeared, Bird agreed to pay $300,000 to settle a nine-count misdemeanor criminal complaint levied by the city attorney's office.

In other words, everything went more or less according to plan. Bird unleashed a cultural phenomenon, sparked a VC frenzy, and remains the clear leader of a renegade group of e-scooter rideshare outfits that includes Lime, Scoot, Skip, Spin, Jump (owned by Uber), and Lyft, with more seemingly arriving every day. "Bird is the classic example of a startup looking like a toy and people underestimating and dismissing it," says David Sacks, an early PayPal executive who invested in the company's seed round. "It's low-cost transportation that's perfect for cities."

Organizing random transportation is a complex task. Bird imports e-scooters from China, and then installs a minicomputer (a "Bird brain") to connect a scooter to the company's software platform. After this modification, the company can see where every Bird is located, lock and unlock the wheels and motor, and throttle a scooter's speed remotely. "It's not as easy as building an app and putting the scooters out there," says VanderZanden. And every night, a motley swarm of freelance Bird "chargers" must gather all the e-scooters wherever they've been parked (or abandoned), recharge them, and redis­tribute them to designated "nests," where riders can easily find them for the morning's commute.

With the hyperfocused VanderZanden, Bird has the kind of leadership needed to handle the difficult mix of technology, logistics, and politics it requires. A serial entrepreneur who's not yet 40 but who's already earned and left a few scars in his career, he is an acknowledged ops maestro and a veteran of both Uber and Lyft. Under VanderZanden, the company has yoked a powerful entrepreneurial vision to a huge mission: to change urban transportation utterly. For its audacity and ambition, for its ferocious execution skills--for demonstrating, even, that sometimes entrepreneurship requires playing in a gray area rather than wearing a white hat--Bird is Inc.'s Company of the Year.

When especially tough local laws prohibit e-scooters, Bird sends in a cadre of policy wonks, lawyers, and lobbyists to persuade legislators to change them. These efforts are led by Bradley Tusk of Tusk Strategies, a former top aide to New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg who made his bones by spearheading Uber's victorious efforts to take on regulators.

Tusk's argument for Bird is this: If cities want to reduce traffic and greenhouse gases, they need people to rethink their approach. Why use a 4,000-pound automobile to go two miles when a bike or e-scooter can better handle that task? Micromobility--as this burgeoning industry of small electric vehicles is called--equals transformation. At least this is what Bird and its e-scooter siblings assert.

"Our mission is very strong: It's to remove cars from the road, reduce traffic, reduce carbon emissions," says VanderZanden, whose relentless drive is perhaps matched only by his dedication to stressing Bird's vision at every possible opportunity. "Every city in the world could benefit from that." More cannily, VanderZanden positions Bird as a means to amend what ride-hailing companies like his former employers Lyft and Uber have wrought--adding more congestion to cities. To correct that, America needs to let go of its "car addiction," he asserts.

"There's already a lane for cars, there's a lane for pedestrians, but there hasn't been enough invested in this third lane," says VanderZanden, discussing bike lanes as if he'd just invented them.

Tusk is currently lobbying in markets, like New York City, Philadelphia, and Chicago, that explicitly ban e-scooters. Cracking these cities would yield enormous riches. In New York, the company is garnering political support from city council members by pitching its service as a way to help Gothamites deal with a 114-year-old subway system that is increasingly notorious for service delays.

Of course, Bird stands to reap benefits, should cities remodel themselves in the way VanderZanden suggests. "No one in this business that I know of is doing it to make an impact on carbon emissions, or improve the environment," says Horace Dediu, founder of the Micromobility Summit, a new event centered on alternative transportation technologies. "Everyone is doing it because there's a shitload of money in e-scooters."

Short, single-occupancy car trips represent 80 to 90 percent of all automobile travel, says Dediu. If you target trips of five miles or less, in urban areas across the world, he says, "you can carve out about 30 percent of all the money in transportation. We're talking trillions of dollars."

Back at Bird headquarters, though, VanderZanden evinces little concern. "Our religion, our true north, is to get cars off the road," he says. The e-scooter is just a starting point; the company will evolve to offer new short-range electric vehicles. "The nice thing is, the name Bird works well with electric scooters all the way to flying cars," says VanderZanden.

Wait. Flying cars?

"Any transportation that doesn't involve a car is on the table for us," he says.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.inc.com/magazine/201902/will-yakowicz/bird-electric-scooter-travis-vanderzanden-2018-company-of-the-year.html&ved=0ahUKEwif9vyt05XfAhWKMd8KHZCSDzcQxfQBCDMwAw&usg=AOvVaw2kWFopPSSfNa3tsWszsEov

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Re: Ashwini Chhabra Head of Public Affairs @ Bird | ex-Uber
« Reply #30 on: December 13, 2018, 04:24:42 PM »

Uber/Bird Mantra, “We all made mistakes,”
"we’ve learned."

Bird, set up by two former Uber employees, is one of the scooter companies poised to change how we get around the capital. It goes head to head with Lime, which operates in Washington DC, San Francisco and Paris, and is funded by Alphabet’s Google Ventures and Uber. Scooters are hired through the Uber app, and Google has added it to the journey planning section of its app. Both Lime and Bird are valued at more than $1 billion.

The competition between Lime, Bird and other scooter start-ups is so intense that it is referred to in San Francisco as “wheelmaggedon”. Tech investors see these companies are part of a long-term plan to change urban life.

Bird is on a charm offensive. From here to the US West Coast the neat 20kg frames have caused quite a stir since they began literally invading the streets of San Francisco last September.

Founded by a former Uber executive Travis VanderZanden, they arrived en masse in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington without official permission, to a distinctly mixed reception: they were wildly popular with those using them to get from A to B, but were loathed by those who had to jump to avoid them on pavements, or found them dumped outside their door. (Lime and other rivals Spin and Jump also played a big part in the disruption, along with dockless e-bike companies such as Ofo).

“We all made mistakes,” admits Corbett. “San Francisco was an example where we just went in, and we’ve learned Fromberg that. If you look at Europe, we only launch where the city approves our launch. So there are no surprises any more. We realise it’s about investing in the city.”

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.standard.co.uk/tech/bird-scooters-london-try-a4016581.html%3Famp&ved=0ahUKEwjE2M3u3J3fAhXQrVkKHWHYB38QyM8BCDkwBA&usg=AOvVaw35vXfwmdFWijBDfZqjjwqx&ampcf=1